YouTube says it will punish creators for ‘harming’ the community

YouTube recently detailed some new policy changes going into effect after the latest controversy featuring YouTube creator Logan Paul, had advertising temporarily suspended on his account today, over videos featuring the abuse of dead animals

YouTube has been reportedly working on these policy guidelines since the start of the year, as one of the company’s goals in 2018 was to create clear policies to punish creators who do “something egregious that causes significant harm” to the community at large.

The changes are straightforward: YouTube says it reserves the right to strip a channel of its ability to serve ads and its access to premium monetization programs like Google Preferred and its YouTube Partner Program, as well as the right to cease recommending a channel’s videos across its network, if that channel proves harmful to the broader YouTube community. YouTube describes its community as including “advertisers, the media industry, and most importantly, the general public.” It’s not clear what exactly fits the definition of harmful in these cases, but it seems as if YouTube will take cues from both the greater YouTube community and the general public.

YouTube said in a statement, “In the past, we felt our responses to some of these situations were slow and didn’t always address our broader community’s concerns. Our ultimate goal here is to streamline our response so we can make better, faster decisions and communicate them clearly.”

“We believe strongly in the freedom of expression and we know that the overwhelming majority of you follow the guidelines and understand that you’re part of a large, influential, and interconnected community. But we also know that we have a responsibility to protect the entire community of creators, viewers, and advertisers from these rare but often damaging situations. We expect to issue these new consequences only in a rare handful of egregious cases, but hope they will help us prevent the actions of a few from harming the broader community.”